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Bristlecone Chapter of the California Native Plant Society

Spring Flower - Mojave Woodyaster

Mojave Woodyaster, Black Canyon,
Photo by Larry Blakely

News:

The September-October 2020 Bristlecone Chapter Newsletter is online - read online or download and print.

The deadline for submitting articles for the next issue is October 15th, 2020.

Upcoming CNPS Events

Field Trips, Meetings, and other events of interest scheduled for the next month or so – for more events, including non-CNPS events which may be of interest to our members, see our Events Page.

CNPS Event September 1-3, 2020: CEQA Impact Assessment With Emphasis on Biological Resources, Sacramento, State CNPS Workshop NOTE - CNPS is cancelling April-July workshops and is postponing decisions on Aug-Oct workshops. They are working on processing refunds for cancelled workshops.

California Native Plant Society plant science training workshops provide botanists, biologists, land managers, and ecologists the scientific skills and practical experience necessary to assess, manage, and protect native plants and lands in California and beyond. Pre-registration is required and many workshops sell out early. Sign up now and secure your spot for 2020 workshops!

In this workshop you will learn how CEQA can be leveraged to give California’s plants and lands a voice in the face of development. We’ll cover how to read and analyze the biological resources section of an EIR or MND, and to submit critical, scientifically-based comments. $375 CNPS Members / $395 Non-Members. Go to the workshop page for details or to register.

September 15-17, 2020: New Dates: October 5-7, 2021: H5II – The Second Conference on the Research and Management of High Elevation Five Needle Pines in Western North America from, Missoula, MT - https://highfivepines.org/ The 2020 H5II Conference was been rescheduled for 2021 due to the uncertainty of the COVID-19 pandemic. The website will be fully updated soon. Registration and Abstract Submission remain open. Already registered for 2020? We will be contacting you with options and refunds if necessary.

The Whitebark Pine Ecosystem Foundation is proud to host H5II, an international conference bringing together forest managers, researchers, and advocates on the future of five-needle pines in high-elevation ecosystems of Western North America. Many high-elevation, five-needle pine forests are rapidly declining throughout North America. In particular, the six species we will focus on (including Great Basin and Rocky Mountain Bristlecone, Whitebark, Limber, and Southwestern White Pine) are of great ecological and symbolic importance to both the U.S. and Canada.

With this conference we intend to: (1) bring together scientists, managers, and concerned citizens to exchange information on the ecology, threats, and management of these important pines; 2) learn about the threats and current status of pine populations; (3) describe efforts to mitigate threats through restoration techniques and action plans; and, (4) build a foundation for the synthesis of research efforts and management approaches. Go to https://highfivepines.org/ for more information and to register

CNPS Event September 16, Wednesday, 6 pm: CNPS Bristlecone Chapter Board Meeting (on Zoom)

All members welcome. To join, contact Kathleen Nelson at goatheads@aol.com

CNPS Event September 23, Wednesday: 7pm, Bristlecone Chapter Virtual General Meeting: California Desert Protection and Desert Flora - CLICK HERE TO JOIN - Recording coming to website soon if you missed it!

Virtual presentation by co-speakers Bryan Hatchell and Maria Jesus.

Bryan Hatchell, whose talk, "Desert Protection and Plant Connection" was canceled in March due to the pandemic, is the Desert Lands Organizer with Friends of the Inyo, and looks at energy development threats in the California Desert Conservation Lands. Plans that guide conservation and renewable energy development in the desert may rapidly change, which strengthens the need of continued advocacy for conservation and science. He will share landscape level issues and then narrow in on what neat desert plants that exist at each site of concern.

Maria Jesus whose April talk at the Maturango Museum and May field trip to Conglomerate Mesa were both cancelled due to the pandemic, is a master’s student at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden/Claremont Graduate University and a 2019 Switzer Fellow. Maria is researching the flora of the Southern Inyo Mountains, Inyo County. She states, “Here, Joshua trees, emblematic of the Mojave Desert, give way to Pinyon and Juniper woodlands which are characteristic of the Great Basin Desert. This unique transition zone is home to many endemic and rare plants including Hesperidanthus jaegeri, Nemacladus ‘inyoensis’, and Perityle inyoensis.” During her presentation, Maria will share her preliminary results of her floristic research, including new occurrences of rare taxa and an update on the conservation status of Conglomerate Mesa.

To join the Zoom Meeting, please click this link and follow the prompts. When the speaker begins, please mute your side of the connection until questions are taken at the ends of the talks. 

September 24-27, 2020: Some Like It Hot: Late Summer Flora of the Eastern Mojave Highlands, Jim André and Tasha La Doux, Sweeney Granite Mountains Desert Research Center, Jepson Herbarium Workshop (Workshop is cancelled (due to COVID-19). This workshop will be offered again in 2021, registration details will be available in December 2020 on the Jepson Herbarium website.)

The Eastern Mojave Desert represents one of the most floristically diverse regions in California. This incredible diversity is, in part, due to the region's proximity to the North American Monsoon and its prominent summer rainfall regime. Approximately 10% of eastern Mojave annuals are considered "summer annuals," species that germinate following summer rainfall. In addition, more than 25% of perennial species in this region flower in late summer/early fall. Examples of plant families that respond to summer rain include: Nyctaginaceae, Amaranthaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Polygonaceae, Poaceae, and Asteraceae. This course will introduce botanists to the ecology and taxonomy of the diverse late summer/early fall flora in the eastern Mojave Desert, with special emphasis on rare or unique species. Through field observation, lab identification, and evening presentations, participants will gain a better understanding for the major plant families that comprise the hot-season flora. This field-intensive workshop is intended for botanists with moderate to advanced taxonomic training, but also for those with an interest in learning more about this seldom-seen component of California's flora. Field trips will target the mid to higher elevations of the Mojave National Preserve, planned in accordance to optimal blooming conditions.

Accommodations: Shared dormitories with bathrooms. Tent camping will also be available.
Meals: Dinner Thursday through lunch Sunday included.
Transportation: Vehicles must have good clearance and sturdy tires (including spare!). Carpooling possible. High clearance 4x4 with extra passenger space preferred.
Hiking: Easy to moderate; short hikes in sometimes rugged terrain.
Start/End: Thursday afternoon - Sunday 12:00 pm.
Course Fee: $570/600
Credit
: This workshop has been approved for 7 Professional Development Credits by the California Consulting Botanist Board of Certification

If you are interested in this workshop, please fill out this Google form

CNPS Event October 15: November-December Bristlecone Chapter Newsletter Deadline

Today is the deadline for submissions for the March-April Bristlecone Chapter Newsletter to our Newsletter Editor, Elaine Chow, at newsletter@bristleconecnps.org. Contact Elaine with any questions.

October 17, 2020: Spatial phylogenetics: A "big data" approach integrating ecology, evolution, and conservation, Brent Mishler, UC Berkeley, Jepson Herbarium Workshop (Hosted ONLINE)

Biodiversity has usually been measured by examining changes in the number of species across a region to identify areas of particularly high species diversity and endemism. Beta-diversity, or turn-over on the landscape, is likewise typically measured by comparing proportions of species shared among subareas. However, investigations based on species distributions alone miss the full richness of understanding that can result from taking a phylogenetic approach. Fortunately, advances in digitization of natural history collections, broad-scale DNA sequencing of many taxa represented in pubic databases, and scaling-up of methods for building phylogenies have made it possible to apply a phylogenetic approach to assessment of biodiversity and endemism that can be termed "spatial phylogenetics." New methods such as Categorical Analysis of Neo- And Paleo-Endemism (CANAPE) and phylogenetic range-weighted turnover (PhyloRWT) can identify hotspots of diversity and endemism, assess their make-up, and characterize similarities and differences among them. Using hypotheses tests based on a spatial randomization, insights can be gained into ecological, evolutionary, and biogeographic processes that have shaped these patterns. These new phylogenetic methods are also useful in conservation assessments by identifying complementary areas of biodiversity that have unique evolutionary histories.

This workshop will be a combination of lecture, classroom activities, and discussion and will cover the basic principles of the methods described above. Examples will be given from the several floras from around the world including Australia, Chile, Norway, and Florida. The cost of this workshop also includes an evening event and reception where the instructor will give a presentation focused on recently published applications of these methods to the California flora.

Start/End: 1-5 pm.
Course Fee: $75
Credit
: This workshop has been approved for 2 Professional Development Credits by the California Consulting Botanist Board of Certification

If you are interested in this workshop, please fill out this Google form

October 19-21, 2020: Wetland Delineation: Identification and Delineation of Federal and State Aquatic Resources, Terry Huffman, Rush Ranch, Solano County, California, Jepson Herbarium Workshop (Workshop is cancelled (due to COVID-19). This workshop will be offered again in 2021, registration details will be available in December 2020 on the Jepson Herbarium website.)

Aquatic resources include wetlands, as well as all other types of aquatic habitats. Wetlands are typically viewed as the soggy portions of the landscape that are covered—often intermittently—with shallow water, have soils saturated with water, and have plants that look different from those in surrounding areas. Scientific studies show that wetlands are essential for maintaining the biological, chemical, and physical integrity of the aquatic ecosystem. Federal and state programs regulate impacts to wetlands and other aquatic habitats as part of their overall water quality protection strategy. These agencies differ in how wetlands and other waters are defined and how they are geographically delineated.

This three-day workshop will emphasize the definitions and delineation methods for wetlands and other aquatic habitats used by the (1) US Army Corps of Engineers and the US Environmental Protection Agency; (2) California State Water Resources Control Board and its Regional Water Quality Control Boards; (3) California Department of Fish and Wildlife; (4) San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission; and (5) the California Coastal Commission. Other definitions and delineation methods used by US Department of Agriculture and the US Fish and Wildlife Service to identify and delineate aquatic resources will also be discussed in comparison to the wetland and other waters definitions and delineation methods used by the Corps and EPA.

The course offers clear and concise explanations and comparisons of the wetland definitions and methods used by these agencies, including the latest changes in methodology and approaches for delineating jurisdictional boundaries; explanations of key terminology; and practical hands-on field experience for private consultants, agency personnel, attorneys, academics, and the general public who are involved with resource protection, impact assessment, environmental restoration, and/or seeking project authorization from the above mentioned agencies. Our course instructor’s primary method of instruction is “learning by doing,” so prepare to get dirty!

We will meet at the Solano Land Trust’s Rush Ranch facility near Suisun City, Solano County, California, for classroom lectures and field training exercises. Classroom lectures in the mornings will prepare us for afternoon field training exercises that provide hands-on experience using the various wetland delineation methods, with a focus on field delineation of wetland-upland boundaries and analysis of results. Field work will include exploring how and why the various definitions and associated methodologies produce different results in terms of wetland area delineated. Class will be held rain or shine! Presented in cooperation with the Solano Land Trust.

Transportation: Personal vehicle required for field trip (carpooling possible)
Hiking: Easy, flat terrain.
Start/End: Monday, 9:00 am – Wednesday, 5:00 pm.
Course Fee: $475/$505
Credit
: This workshop has been approved for 7 Professional Development Credits by the California Consulting Botanist Board of Certification

If you are interested in this workshop, please fill out this Google form

CNPS Event October 27-29, 2020: Mitigation Measures & Monitoring With Emphasis on Botanical Resource Issues, Imperial Beach, State CNPS Workshop IN-PERSON WILL BE CANCELLED, online version TBD

California Native Plant Society plant science training workshops provide botanists, biologists, land managers, and ecologists the scientific skills and practical experience necessary to assess, manage, and protect native plants and lands in California and beyond. Pre-registration is required and many workshops sell out early. Sign up now and secure your spot for 2020 workshops!

In this workshop you will learn the framework for mitigation and mitigation monitoring, especially considering botanical resources, and how laws like CEQA can be leveraged to advocate for responsible mitigation measures that keep California’s natural habitat resources in mind. $375 CNPS Members / $395 Non-Members. Go to the workshop page for details or to register.

October 27-30: Cal-IPC Symposium ONLINE: Recovery and Resilience: Confronting Fire, Weeds, and Forest Pests

This year, we’re gathering online, giving us the opportunity to safely connect with community members from across the state – and beyond – to get the latest updates on effective tools, relevant research, and strategic management approaches. Participate in session talks, discussion groups, and posters covering a wide range of topics related to invasive plant biology and management. Register now! Early bird rates through September 1st: www.cal-ipc.org/resources/symposium/

For more events, including some from other organizations, see the Bristlecone Chapter Events Page

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The California Native Plant Society (CNPS) is a state-wide 501(c)3 non-profit organization of lay persons and professionals who share an interest in California’s native plants. The Society, working through its local chapters, seeks to increase the understanding of California’s native flora and to preserve this rich resource for future generations. Membership is open to all.

The Bristlecone Chapter covers all of Mono and Inyo Counties and northeastern Kern County, an area that includes the east slope of the Sierra Nevada, the Northern Mojave Desert, the Inyo and White Mountains, and the Owens Valley. The southern end of the Bristlecone Chapter’s geographically large territory, in and around the Indian Wells Valley, has its own sub-chapter, Creosote Ring.

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